Miami Stories

The Miami Stories initiative collects stories about Miami’s past, present, and future. Through this oral history project, HistoryMiami Museum documents life in the Magic City through written stories, video submissions, and audio recordings, which are preserved in the museum’s archive, and shared online and through local media outlets.


Your Story Matters

HistoryMiami Museum accepts written stories and video submissions on a rolling basis. We welcome written stories between 500-1,000 words and video stories under 5 minutes about life in Miami. We encourage storytellers to submit a photo with their written story. To submit a written story, complete the Miami Stories Submission Form. To submit a video story, click on the video story link.

 

How did you or your family get to Miami?

When do you feel like a Miamian?

What would you miss if you left Miami?

What makes Miami, Miami?

What do you see for Miami’s future?


Click here to submit your story today!
or
Click here to create a video and share on social media

 


Mariel Stories

In collaboration with the Cuban Heritage Collection at the University of Miami Libraries and as a part of the program El efecto Mariel: Before, During, and After, HistoryMiami Museum is collecting stories related to the Mariel boatlift of 1980. Members of the community are encouraged to share their personal  memories, stories, and reflections related to Mariel. Stories will be collected virtually on a rolling basis and a series of prompts give participants ideas from where they can begin their story. Submitted stories will become part of the permanent collections of the HistoryMiami Museum and Cuban Heritage Collection and featured on both online platforms.

Learn more and share your Mariel Story

 


 

Miami Stories Recording Booth

 

 

The Miami Stories Recording Booth allows the museum to capture audio stories at local events.

 

For more information about booking the Miami Stories Recording Booth, see the Recording Booth Information Sheet or contact us at miamistories@historymiami.org.

 

 

 


Explore the Miami Stories Archives

 

VIDEO STORIES

Submit your video story

 

Click here to watch these videos with closed captioning.

10 Days of Connection Online Exhibit

As part of the 2020 10 Days of Connection, HistoryMiami Museum invited South Florida residents to share a story about an item that reflects an aspect of their cultural identity and build a community exhibit. We continue to collect these stories and invite you to share yours. Either by yourself or accompanied by your loved ones, submit a video explaining how this object represents your cultural identity. Feel free to submit your story in the language of your choice.

 

AUDIO STORIES

Click here to access the Miami Stories Audio Archive

 

 

WRITTEN STORIES

Mark Stevens

The MapQuest website ranks Hialeah as “the densest American city in terms of population not to feature a skyscraper,” and WalletHub rates it as 96th on its list of the hundred best and worst U.S. cities for an active lifestyle. But when I was a kid growing up there during… Read More

Heidi L. Anthony

I started working at Miami International Airport in 1988. My mind was young and impressionable and clueless. I was a public service assistant and I was to provide information to the many lost people who happened upon my information counter located in the heart of the airport. Every day,… Read More

Anita Meyer Meinbach

There are memories we carry in our hearts and shape who we become. My memories of Miami began on April 27, 1957, when my “pioneering” parents, Lucy and Alan Meyer, brother Joel and I walked down the stairs of a prop plane at Miami International Airport into a strange new… Read More

Reverand J. Peter Sheehan

In the winter of 1915, a wealthy widow visited South Florida with her nurse to escape the harsh Canadian weather. That lady was my maternal great-grandmother, Mary Long Byrnes, from Collingwood, Ontario. Mrs. Byrnes was delighted by the tropical climate and decided to stay the season at the old Green… Read More

Mary Lou Pfeiffer

“Tonight we launch — where shall we anchor?” This was the motto chosen by the first graduating class at the new Ida M. Fisher High School in 1927, when the five graduates were honored with their diplomas. My mother, Helen E. Johnson, was the class president and her… Read More